Mobiledatingapplications org

It is quite common for media accounts to position new technologies that enhance women’s sexual or spatial mobilities as the cause of sexual risk or violence.

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Using location-aware technology, Tinder links to an individual’s Facebook in order to create profiles consisting of a name, age, and photos, with an option of providing a short biographical blurb (Newall, 2015).

The requirement to hold a Facebook account, and sign in to Tinder using this account, offers a sense of assurance to users that people on Tinder are being authentic regarding their identity (Duguay, 2016).

Although there has been immense media interest in Tinder, virtually no published research on people’s experiences of using the app exists.

In this paper, we begin to address this gap by examining the experiences of a small group of young heterosexual women in NZ who use Tinder.

In what continues to be a society governed by patriarchal power relations, struggles against sexual assault and gender-based violence remain life-threatening risks for women (Gavey, 2005; Vance, 1984).

At the same time as women are encouraged to explore their sexuality and be sexually active, explorative and experienced (Farvid, 2014; Farvid & Braun, 2006) they are warned against, and live in a context where, there are real material risks associated with doing so (Farvid & Braun 2013, 2014).

Abstract: Tinder is a mobile dating app that has recently taken off among young heterosexuals.

While attracting great media attention, little scholarly work exists on the topic.

Although this discourse is supposedly gender-blind, it is intersected by other discourses which affect men and women differently.

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