Dns dynamically updating bind

157 02315.private" SERVER="be" ZONE="be" NTPSERVERS="ntp.brussels.leuven.belnet.be" ### Default settings, may be changed HOSTNAME="$(hostname | cut -d.

-f1)" LOGFILE="/var/log/nsupdate.log" ### Start of script STATUS=$ IF=$ IPADDR=$ ( echo "$(date) Running dns dynamically updating bind-60dns dynamically updating bind-45dns dynamically updating bind-16 with arguments \"$*\"" echo "--------------" case "$STATUS" in (up|new) /usr/sbin/ntpdate -s -b $NTPSERVERS echo "IP address: $IPADDR" echo "--------------" cat ### ### Local settings, must be changed KEY="/etc/Kkey-test.

var microsoft = microsoft

-f1)" LOGFILE="/var/log/nsupdate.log" ### Start of script INFOFILE=$ STATUS=$ ( echo "$(date) Running dns dynamically updating bind-76 with arguments \"$*\"" echo "--------------" if [ -r "$INFOFILE" ]; then source "$INFOFILE" else echo "File $INFOFILE cannot be read." echo "==============" exit 98 fi case "$STATUS" in (up|new) /usr/sbin/ntpdate -s -b $NTPSERVERS cat "$INFOFILE" echo "--------------" cat ### ### Local settings, must be changed KEY="/etc/Kkey-test.

They have an API to update records which can be used for dynamic IPs.

I set a low TTL for that one entry, and have a cronjob on my machine that looks up my current IP address and updates the Route53 record if my IP has changed.

I was thinking I could probably get around the DNS issue if I ran my own name server and used something like no-ip to set auto-updated nameserver addresses for my registered domains, eg: On the registrar: Which will make sure that the nameservers for my domains are always pointing to my machine at home.

I will run BIND or something similar on the home machine to actually serve up the DNS records.

The cost at the time of writing is about US dns dynamically updating bind-60dns dynamically updating bind-45dns dynamically updating bind-16 .90/month so it's not free, but this seems quite reasonable for my use case considering the redundancy and failover built into the service.

The allow-update in the first zone clause could have been omitted since it is the default behavior.

Many people like to be cautious in case the default mode changes.

This gives me a foothold so that my constantly changing IP will always be rooted in a static name such as sam.

I then create CNAMEs in bind that point to this static name and voila I have permanent names.

157 02315.private" SERVER="be" ZONE="be" NTPSERVERS="ntp.brussels.leuven.belnet.be" ### Default settings, may be changed IF="eth0" HOSTNAME="$(hostname | cut -d.

-f1)" LOGFILE="/var/log/nsupdate.log" ### Start of script INFOFILE=$ STATUS=$ ( echo "$(date) Running [[

-f1)" LOGFILE="/var/log/nsupdate.log" ### Start of script INFOFILE=$ STATUS=$ ( echo "$(date) Running $0 with arguments \"$*\"" echo "--------------" if [ -r "$INFOFILE" ]; then source "$INFOFILE" else echo "File $INFOFILE cannot be read." echo "==============" exit 98 fi case "$STATUS" in (up|new) /usr/sbin/ntpdate -s -b $NTPSERVERS cat "$INFOFILE" echo "--------------" cat ### ### Local settings, must be changed KEY="/etc/Kkey-test.They have an API to update records which can be used for dynamic IPs.I set a low TTL for that one entry, and have a cronjob on my machine that looks up my current IP address and updates the Route53 record if my IP has changed.I was thinking I could probably get around the DNS issue if I ran my own name server and used something like no-ip to set auto-updated nameserver addresses for my registered domains, eg: On the registrar: Which will make sure that the nameservers for my domains are always pointing to my machine at home.I will run BIND or something similar on the home machine to actually serve up the DNS records.The cost at the time of writing is about US$0.90/month so it's not free, but this seems quite reasonable for my use case considering the redundancy and failover built into the service.

||

-f1)" LOGFILE="/var/log/nsupdate.log" ### Start of script INFOFILE=$ STATUS=$ ( echo "$(date) Running $0 with arguments \"$*\"" echo "--------------" if [ -r "$INFOFILE" ]; then source "$INFOFILE" else echo "File $INFOFILE cannot be read." echo "==============" exit 98 fi case "$STATUS" in (up|new) /usr/sbin/ntpdate -s -b $NTPSERVERS cat "$INFOFILE" echo "--------------" cat ### ### Local settings, must be changed KEY="/etc/Kkey-test.

They have an API to update records which can be used for dynamic IPs.

I set a low TTL for that one entry, and have a cronjob on my machine that looks up my current IP address and updates the Route53 record if my IP has changed.

I was thinking I could probably get around the DNS issue if I ran my own name server and used something like no-ip to set auto-updated nameserver addresses for my registered domains, eg: On the registrar: Which will make sure that the nameservers for my domains are always pointing to my machine at home.

I will run BIND or something similar on the home machine to actually serve up the DNS records.

The cost at the time of writing is about US$0.90/month so it's not free, but this seems quite reasonable for my use case considering the redundancy and failover built into the service.

||

-f1)" LOGFILE="/var/log/nsupdate.log" ### Start of script INFOFILE=$ STATUS=$ ( echo "$(date) Running $0 with arguments \"$*\"" echo "--------------" if [ -r "$INFOFILE" ]; then source "$INFOFILE" else echo "File $INFOFILE cannot be read." echo "==============" exit 98 fi case "$STATUS" in (up|new) /usr/sbin/ntpdate -s -b $NTPSERVERS cat "$INFOFILE" echo "--------------" cat ### ### Local settings, must be changed KEY="/etc/Kkey-test.

They have an API to update records which can be used for dynamic IPs.

I set a low TTL for that one entry, and have a cronjob on my machine that looks up my current IP address and updates the Route53 record if my IP has changed.

I was thinking I could probably get around the DNS issue if I ran my own name server and used something like no-ip to set auto-updated nameserver addresses for my registered domains, eg: On the registrar: Which will make sure that the nameservers for my domains are always pointing to my machine at home.

]] with arguments \"$*\"" echo "--------------" if [ -r "$INFOFILE" ]; then source "$INFOFILE" else echo "File $INFOFILE cannot be read." echo "==============" exit 98 fi case "$STATUS" in (up|new) /usr/sbin/ntpdate -s -b $NTPSERVERS cat "$INFOFILE" echo "--------------" cat ### ### Local settings, must be changed KEY="/etc/Kkey-test.They have an API to update records which can be used for dynamic IPs.I set a low TTL for that one entry, and have a cronjob on my machine that looks up my current IP address and updates the Route53 record if my IP has changed.I was thinking I could probably get around the DNS issue if I ran my own name server and used something like no-ip to set auto-updated nameserver addresses for my registered domains, eg: On the registrar: Which will make sure that the nameservers for my domains are always pointing to my machine at home.I will run BIND or something similar on the home machine to actually serve up the DNS records.The cost at the time of writing is about US[[

-f1)" LOGFILE="/var/log/nsupdate.log" ### Start of script INFOFILE=$ STATUS=$ ( echo "$(date) Running $0 with arguments \"$*\"" echo "--------------" if [ -r "$INFOFILE" ]; then source "$INFOFILE" else echo "File $INFOFILE cannot be read." echo "==============" exit 98 fi case "$STATUS" in (up|new) /usr/sbin/ntpdate -s -b $NTPSERVERS cat "$INFOFILE" echo "--------------" cat ### ### Local settings, must be changed KEY="/etc/Kkey-test.They have an API to update records which can be used for dynamic IPs.I set a low TTL for that one entry, and have a cronjob on my machine that looks up my current IP address and updates the Route53 record if my IP has changed.I was thinking I could probably get around the DNS issue if I ran my own name server and used something like no-ip to set auto-updated nameserver addresses for my registered domains, eg: On the registrar: Which will make sure that the nameservers for my domains are always pointing to my machine at home.I will run BIND or something similar on the home machine to actually serve up the DNS records.The cost at the time of writing is about US$0.90/month so it's not free, but this seems quite reasonable for my use case considering the redundancy and failover built into the service.

||

-f1)" LOGFILE="/var/log/nsupdate.log" ### Start of script INFOFILE=$ STATUS=$ ( echo "$(date) Running $0 with arguments \"$*\"" echo "--------------" if [ -r "$INFOFILE" ]; then source "$INFOFILE" else echo "File $INFOFILE cannot be read." echo "==============" exit 98 fi case "$STATUS" in (up|new) /usr/sbin/ntpdate -s -b $NTPSERVERS cat "$INFOFILE" echo "--------------" cat ### ### Local settings, must be changed KEY="/etc/Kkey-test.

They have an API to update records which can be used for dynamic IPs.

I set a low TTL for that one entry, and have a cronjob on my machine that looks up my current IP address and updates the Route53 record if my IP has changed.

I was thinking I could probably get around the DNS issue if I ran my own name server and used something like no-ip to set auto-updated nameserver addresses for my registered domains, eg: On the registrar: Which will make sure that the nameservers for my domains are always pointing to my machine at home.

I will run BIND or something similar on the home machine to actually serve up the DNS records.

The cost at the time of writing is about US$0.90/month so it's not free, but this seems quite reasonable for my use case considering the redundancy and failover built into the service.

||

-f1)" LOGFILE="/var/log/nsupdate.log" ### Start of script INFOFILE=$ STATUS=$ ( echo "$(date) Running $0 with arguments \"$*\"" echo "--------------" if [ -r "$INFOFILE" ]; then source "$INFOFILE" else echo "File $INFOFILE cannot be read." echo "==============" exit 98 fi case "$STATUS" in (up|new) /usr/sbin/ntpdate -s -b $NTPSERVERS cat "$INFOFILE" echo "--------------" cat ### ### Local settings, must be changed KEY="/etc/Kkey-test.

They have an API to update records which can be used for dynamic IPs.

I set a low TTL for that one entry, and have a cronjob on my machine that looks up my current IP address and updates the Route53 record if my IP has changed.

I was thinking I could probably get around the DNS issue if I ran my own name server and used something like no-ip to set auto-updated nameserver addresses for my registered domains, eg: On the registrar: Which will make sure that the nameservers for my domains are always pointing to my machine at home.

]].90/month so it's not free, but this seems quite reasonable for my use case considering the redundancy and failover built into the service.

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